Social Studies

The ongoing history of mankind, its triumphs and failures continues to be written by successive generations of peoples whose existence have left indelible imprints on the pages of time. It is for the true historian to capture the essence of what has transpired in the past, review it thoroughly, interpret it accurately, record it painstakingly and transmit it honestly to those who will follow. The Social Studies Department at Bishop Kelly High School accepts its responsibility for conveying an honest and complete rendition of history’s chronicles to its students.

Bishop Kelly High School social studies instructors and students will jointly probe the subject matter before them not only with a view to learning what has taken place in the past but, also, with a desire of understanding how those events can best be interpreted so as to learn from them and be positioned to apply this knowledge to future events.

In this light, the department, in all its course offerings—history, government, and psychology—will endeavor to expose and explore the positive contributions which the Catholic Church has made to humanity over the past 2000 years. Nowhere will this be made more evident than in the study of American history where the work of the early missionaries, the presence of a vast educational system, the impact of countless hospitals and orphanages, and the labors of numerous social agencies have assisted uncountable people of all races, creeds and colors to live more rewarding lives. Likewise, the Catholic Church’s long-standing and unwavering position on social justice—both in the workplace and society as a whole—will be a visible and integral part of the study of American and international governments.

Courses and Prerequisites:

+UNITED STATES HISTORY

Grade Level: 11

Course ID# 1320 – Two Semesters (FY)

Untied States History, a required course for juniors, will survey the history of our nation beginning with the Progressive Era and continuing to contemporary times. It will cover that wide range of topics and issues, which combined to play rolls in the growth and development of the United States. The curriculum will treat the social problems, which have plagued American society through the years along with the impact that business, industry and politics, national and international, have played on its growth. Attention will be directed to our nation’s international relationships with others in a global world. The curriculum will integrate computer skills and the Internet as it engages in cooperative reading and writing projects with the school’s English Department.

+AP UNITED STATES HISTORY

Grade Level: 11
Prerequisites: A or B in World History. Application Required.

Course ID# 1320 – Two Semesters (FY)

AP United States History is available to those students who are interested in a more in-depth course in the historical development of America from Colonial times to the present. Students will work with more complex materials and at a quicker pace than that found in a standard high school class. Course work will be geared toward developing and practicing those skills, which are required at the college level. Students will learn to locate relevant and trustworthy sources and how to organize evidence to support their arguments. Focus will be placed on cause and effect relationships as well as on the climate in which opinions were formed and decisions made as historical events and issues are explored. Both primary and secondary sources will be used.

+WORLD HISTORY

Grade Level: 10

Course ID# 1300 – Two Semesters (FY)

World History will develop a greater understanding of the evolution of global processes and contacts, in interaction with different types of human societies between 1400 and the present. This understanding is advanced through a combination of selective factual knowledge and appropriate analytical skills. The course highlights the nature of changes in international frameworks and their causes and consequences as well as comparisons among major societies. The course will build on an understanding of cultural, institutional, and technological precedents that, along with geography, set the human stage for nearly two thousand years.

+AMERICAN GOVERNMENT

Grade Level: 12

Course ID# 1330 – Two Semesters (FY)

American Government is a two-semester class, which focuses on the three branches of American government – executive legislative and judicial. This course will also deal with the United States Constitution and the political system which exists in our nation. Attention will be directed to the roles the United States plays as a world power and its relationships with governments around the globe. A range of contemporary international issues will be addressed from the perspective of their impact on American society – particularly the economic stability of the nation. An analysis will also be made of the similarities and differences between state and federal governmental structures/powers. An in-depth study of the Idaho state system of government will be made and field trips will be taken to view the legislature in session. Attention will be directed toward those economic, social and geographic issues which impact the operation of the Idaho state government.

+PSYCHOLOGY

Grade Levels: 11, 12

Course ID# 1321 – First Semester (S1)
Course ID# 1322 – Second Semester (S2)

This course will provide students with an overview of the fundamental principles of psychology while considering it from the perspective of its being a social science. Focusing on both the development and understanding of human behavior, the class will study a representative number of those personalities who advanced this science. Students will be guided through a consideration of the workings of the human psyche and the manner in which it seeks to cope with the ever-changing challenges of a growingly complex world. Personality and adjustment, sensation and perception, social problems and behavior will be among the topics considered.

+ECONOMICS

Grade Level: 11,12

Microeconomics/Concurrent Enrollment Option:

Course ID# 1301 – Fall Semester (S1)

Students have the option to take this course as a concurrent/dual credit course through Boise State University. Three credits are offered for this course as EC 202: Principles of Microeconomics. Students may also opt to take the AP Microeconomics exam.

Microeconomics is one of the two-course sequence of introductory economics courses. In microeconomics we will define economics, explore the underlying fundamentals common to all economic systems, and develop and examine a basic framework for analysis of the overall economic interactions that take place in our economy. In the first weeks of the course we will examine the problems causes by scarcity, how process in our economy act effectively to allocate scarce resources between all participants in our economy. Building on these fundamentals, we will then explore the economic decision making by the smallest of economic units, the individual household, or firm. We will discover how these small economic units make “good” or rational economic decisions. Study will then focus on the differing market structures that operate in our economy.

Having developed these fundamental theoretical tools, we will then focus upon some of the areas of applied economic; regulation and antitrust, supply and demand for the factors of production, wage determination, international trade, and the economic problems faced by specific industries.

Macroeconomics/Concurrent Enrollment Option:

Course ID# 1302 – Spring Semester (S2)

Students have the option to take this course as a concurrent enrollment/dual credit course through Boise State University. Three credits are offered for this course as EC 201: Principles of Macroeconomics. Students may also opt to take the AP Macroeconomics exam.

Macroeconomics is one of the two-course sequence of introductory economics course. In macroeconomics we will define economics, explore the underlying fundamentals common to all economic systems, and develop and examine a basic framework for analysis of the overall economic interactions that take place in our economy. In the first weeks of the course we will examine the problems causes by scarcity, how process in our economy act effectively to allocate scarce resources between all participants in our economy. Building on these fundamentals, we will then explore the measurement of aggregate economic activity, unemployment, and price level. This will lead to the exploration of theories regarding overall economic activity and the policies that decision-makers use to control economic activity.

Having developed these fundamental theoretical tools, we will then focus upon the role that money plays in our economy, the importance of the banking system, and the important role that the Federal Reserve Banking System has in maintaining economic stability and growth. Lastly, we will explore some areas of current macroeconomic interests such as the Federal Budget deficit/surplus, monetary and fiscal policies, economic growth and international trade.

+SPANISH 3

Grade Levels: 10, 11, 12
Prerequisite: Spanish 2 or Instructor Approval

Corse ID# 1560 – Two Semesters (FY)

Students will be exposed to more sophisticated vocabulary and sentence structure in this course, and will use present, past and future tenses with more ease. While continuously reinforcing their oral skills, students will devote more time writing and reading in Spanish. Their readings will include articles, poems, essays and short stories. They will be expected to write dialogues, stories, essays and articles. Students will be exposed to the art, history, geography and culture of Spain and South America.

+SPANISH 4

Grade Levels: 10, 11, 12
Prerequisite: Spanish 3 or Instructor Approval

Course ID# 1570 – Two Semesters (FY)

This course will continue the work of Spanish 3 and fine-tune a student’s oral proficiency. They will be expected to use Spanish in a variety of new and more complex situations. Time will be devoted to developing writing skills and the course will also cultivate reading skills through the use of short stories, comics, and articles. Students will also continue to pursue greater cultural understanding of the Spanish-speaking world.

+AP SPANISH

Grade Levels: 10, 11, 12
Prerequisite: A or B in Spanish 4 or Instructor Approval

Course ID# 1580 – Two Semesters (FY)

The AP Spanish Language course is designed to be comparable to an advanced level (fifth and sixth semester) college/university Spanish language course. Students will continue to master the grammatical structures of Spanish, and will be called upon to perfect their skills in reading, writing, speaking and listening. They will be exposed to a wide range of literature representative of the Hispanic world and will be called upon to display a high level of proficiency in its interpretation. The course will contain authentic material which will be selected to prepare students to take the Advanced Placement Examination in the spring of the year – should they choose to do so. Students should expect an average of four hours of homework every week.

+THE AMERICAN WEST

Grade Levels: 11, 12

Course ID# 1311 – First Semester (S1)
Course ID# 1312 – Second Semester (S2)

This course covers the history of the American West from European contact through the late 20th century, with a particular focus on the 19th and 20th centuries. Students will explore the lives of various individuals and historical developments, paying close attention to the different experiences of whites and blacks, men and women, natives and immigrants, and workers and farmers. The objective is to be neither comprehensive nor definitive, but to introduce students to key themes, events and personalities of the period and to develop critical thinking, writing, and reading skills while gaining appreciation of the cultural diversity that is the American West.

+AP AMERICAN GOVERNMENT

Grade Levels: 12
Prerequisite: A or B in U.S. History or AP U.S. History. Application Required.

Course ID# 1340 – Two Semesters (FY)

Advanced Placement (AP) Government and Politics is comprised of two courses of study: AP United States Government and Politics and AP Comparative Government and Politics. The course provides qualified students with a learning experience equivalent to that obtained in most college introductory courses in government and politics. AP U.S. Government and Politics gives students an analytical perspective on government and politics in the United States. This course includes both the study of general concepts used to interpret U.S. politics and the analysis of specific examples. It also requires familiarity with the various institutions, groups, beliefs, and ideas that constitute U.S. politics. Students become acquainted with the variety of theoretical perspectives and explanations for various behaviors and outcomes. Comparative Government and Politics provides students with the conceptual tools necessary to develop an understanding of some of the world’s diverse political structures and practices. The course encompasses the study of both specific countries and their governments and general concepts used to interpret the political relationships and institutions found in virtually all national politics. Five countries form the core of the course. Four of these countries – Great Britain, France, China, and Russia/the former Soviet Union – are commonly covered in college-level introductory comparative politics courses. For the fifth country, teachers may choose to study India, Mexico, or Nigeria.