AP Classes & Concurrent Enrollment

Advanced Placement (AP) classes are college-level classes offered on the high school campus. Advanced Placement is a national program culminating in the AP Exam administered by the College Board. Many colleges and universities around the nation award credit based on scores from the AP Exams.

Attention Students!  You must complete an AP Application Form for each AP class you are applying for enrollment for the 2017-2018 school year.

AP APPLICATION FORMS:

AP Art

AP Biology

AP Calculus AB

AP Chemistry

AP Computer Science

AP Computer Science Principles

AP Environmental Science

AP Human Geography

AP Language & Composition

AP Literature & Composition

AP Macroeconomics

AP Microeconomics

AP Physics 1

AP Physics 2

AP Spanish Language

AP Statistics

AP U.S. Government & Politics

AP U.S. History

 

+AP ART

Grade Levels:  11, 12
Prerequisite:  At least two of the courses listed above, or Instructor Approval

Course ID#100 – Two Semesters (FY)

AP Art will enable students to work and learn according to the guidelines of the Advanced Placement Program.  Portfolios will be created and -with student and parent approval- may be submitted to be judged by the College Board with possible credit awarded by colleges from throughout the nation.  An area of concentration will be chosen by students in which they will explore one medium or idea in depth.  In addition, sections dealing with drawing, color/design, and sculpture will be required.  Work is submitted digitally to the College Board for evaluation.

+AP BIOLOGY

Grade Levels:  11, 12
Prerequisite:  Students may enroll directly in AP Biology with an A or B grade in Conceptual Physics/ Physics and Chemistry (Biology is not a prerequisite, but if taken student must have received an A or B).  Application required.

Course ID# 1240 – Two Semesters (FY)

AP Biology is a two-semester, college-level course.  This course is a detailed survey of the main concepts of biology with an emphasis on cellular processes, genetic principles, evolution, and ecology.  This course is designed for students who intend to major in the sciences and those in pre-med and related fields.  The college-level course in biology differs significantly from the usual first high school course in biology with respect to range and depth of topics covered, the type of laboratory work done and the time and effort required of students.  It aims to provide students with the conceptual framework, factual knowledge, and analytical skills necessary to deal critically with the rapidly changing science of biology.  Students and parents should be prepared for the unusually high demands on time and energy this course requires.  It is imperative that students remain consistently focused and organized throughout the entire year.  Students have the option to take the Advanced Placement Exam and/or enroll in the Concurrent Enrollment Program through Boise State University.

+AP CALCULUS AB

Grade Level: 11,12
Prerequisite: A or B in Precalculus and Instructor Approval

Course ID# 650 – Two Semesters (FY)

AP Calculus AB will provide qualified students with a college level mathematics experience containing topics included in a rigorous first semester college calculus course. TI-83 or TI-84 and TI-89 calculators are required for this course. Students have the option to take the Advanced Placement Exam and/or enroll in the Concurrent Enrollment Program through Boise State University.

+AP CHEMISTRY

Grade Levels:  11, 12
Prerequisite:  A or B in one of the following courses: Chemistry, Conceptual Physics or Physics (concurrent).  Application required.

Course ID# 1270 – Two Semesters (FY)

This second year class will focus on the theoretical aspects of chemistry.  Topics, which will be covered in depth, will include the structure of matter, chemical bonding, nuclear chemistry, states of matter, reaction types, stoichiometry, equilibrium, kinetics and descriptive chemistry.  Problem solving and application of theoretical concepts will be emphasized.  This course is highly recommended to those college-bound students who plan to study life science, chemistry or engineering.

+AP COMPUTER SCIENCE

Grade Levels: 10, 11, 12
Prerequisite:  A or B in Computer Programming, Algebra 1, and Geometry.

Course ID# 400 – Two Semesters (FY)

The AP Computer Science A course is a tech-prep, computer programming course that prepares students for post-secondary study in a high-demand occupation.  The course emphasizes software development, problem analysis, programming methodology, documentation and testing, and an in-depth study of algorithms, data structures, and data abstractions.  Students in the AP Computer Science A course use the Java programming language to learn and practice major computer science concepts and also work with a large program as they examine and explore the GridWorld case study.  At the end of the prescribed number of hours, students may take the AP Computer Science A exam.

+AP COMPUTER SCIENCE PRINCIPLES

Grade Levels: 10, 11, 12
Prerequisites:  A or B in Algebra 1; Demonstrated prior knowledge or completion of “Exploring Computer Science” with a grade of A or B.

Course ID#  – Two Semesters (FY)

AP Computer Science Principles introduces students to the foundational concepts of computer science and challenges them to explore how computing and technology can impact the world. With a unique focus on creative problem solving and real-world applications, AP Computer Science Principles prepares students for college and career. The Mobile CSP course uses the visual programming language, MIT App Inventor for Android, to provide a rigorous, programming-based introduction to computer science using a project-based curriculum. Students learn computer science by building socially useful mobile apps. In this way, student learning will be associated closely with their interests and grounded in their schools, their homes, and their communities.

+AP ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE

Grade Levels:  11, 12
Prerequisite:  A or B in Biology and Conceptual Physics

Course ID# 1280 – Two Semesters (FY)

The goal of the AP Environmental Science course is to provide students with the scientific principles, concepts, and methodologies required to understand the interrelationships of the natural and human-made, to identify and analyze environmental problems both natural and human-made, to evaluate the negative  risks associated with these problems and to examine alternative solutions for resolving and/or preventing these problems.  The class will be inquiry driven with hands-on labs applying concepts learned through research and instruction.  Students should be prepared to invest a great deal of time and energy into the course.  In order to succeed on the AP exam, it is imperative that students remain consistently focused and organized throughout the entire year.

+AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY

Grade Levels:  10, 11, 12
Prerequisite:  Background in World History, Application Required

Course ID# 1280 – Two Semesters (FY)

The AP Human Geography course is equivalent to an introductory college-level course in human geography. The course introduces students to the systematic study of patterns and processes that have shaped human understanding, use, and alteration of Earth’s surface. Students employ spatial concepts and landscape analysis to examine socioeconomic organization and its environmental consequences. They also learn about the methods and tools geographers use in their research and applications. The curriculum reflects the goals of the National Geography Standards (2012).

+AP LANGUAGE & COMPOSITION

Grade Level: 11
Prerequisite: A or B in English 10 and Application Required

Course ID# – Two Semesters (FY)

AP English Language and Composition engages students in becoming skilled readers of prose written in a variety of rhetorical contexts and in becoming skilled writers who compose for a variety of purposes.  In addition, students will be taught to read complex texts with understanding and to write prose of sufficient richness and complexity to communicate effectively with mature readers.  Students will be encouraged to place their emphasis on content, purpose and audience and to allow this focus to guide the organization of their writing.

+AP LITERATURE & COMPOSITION

Grade Level: 12
Prerequisite: A or B in English 11 and Application Required

Course ID# 240 – Two Semesters (FY)

The College Board, instead of publishing a set curriculum, offers the following suggestions for key elements in an Advanced Placement English course in Literature and Composition: The course should include intensive study of representative works from various genres and periods, concentrating on works of recognized literary merit. Reading in an AP course should be both wide and deep. Students should read works from several genres and periods–from the sixteenth to the twentieth century–but, more importantly, they should get to know a few works well. They should read deliberately and thoroughly, taking time to understand a work’s complexity to absorb its richness of meaning and to analyze how that meaning is embodied in literary form. Careful attention to both textual detail and historical context should provide a foundation; however, critical perspectives are also brought to bear on the literary works studied. Writing is also an integral part of the AP English Literature and Composition course. It should focus on the critical analysis of literature and should include expository, analytical, and argumentative essays. The goal of writing should be to increase students’ ability to explain clearly, cogently, even elegantly, what they understand about literary works and why they interpret them as they do.

+AP MICROECONOMICS

Grade Levels: 11, 12

Course ID# – Fall Semester (S1)

Students have the option to take this course as an AP class or as a concurrent enrollment/dual credit course through Boise State University.  Three credits are offered for this course as EC 202: Principles of Microeconomics.  Students may also opt to take the AP Microeconomics exam.

Microeconomics is one of the two-course sequence of introductory economics courses.  Students will define economics, explore the underlying fundamentals common to all economic systems, and develop and examine a basic framework for analysis of the overall economic interactions that take place in our economy.  Students will examine the problems caused by scarcity and how prices in our economy act effectively to allocate scarce resources between all participants in our economy.  Building on these fundamentals, we will then explore the economic decision making by the smallest of economic units, the individual, household, or firm.  We will discover how these small economic units make “good” or rational economic decisions.  Study will then focus on the differing market structures that operate in our economy.

Having developed these fundamental theoretical tools, students will then focus upon some of the areas of applied economics; regulation and antitrust, supply and demand for the factors of production, wage determination, international trade, and the economic problems faced by specific industries.

+AP MACROECONOMICS

Grade Levels: 11, 12
Prerequisite:

Course ID# – Spring Semester (S1)

Students have the option to take this course as an AP class or as a concurrent enrollment/dual credit course through Boise State University.  Three credits are offered for this course as EC 201:  Principles of Macroeconomics.  Students may also opt to take the AP Macroeconomics exam.

Macroeconomics is second of the two-course sequence of introductory economics courses.  This course will define economics, explore the underlying fundamentals common to all economic systems, and develop and examine a basic framework for analysis of the overall economic interactions that take place in our economy.  Students will examine the problems caused by scarcity, how prices in our economy act effectively to allocate scarce resources between all participants in our economy.  Building on these fundamentals, we will then explore the measurement of aggregate economic activity, unemployment, and price level.  In addition, exploration of theories regarding overall economic activity and the policies that decision-makers use to control economic activity will be studied.

Having developed these fundamental theoretical tools, students will learn the role that money plays in our economy, the importance of the banking system, and the important role that the Federal Reserve Banking System has in maintaining economic stability and growth.  Lastly, we will explore some areas of current macroeconomic interest such as the Federal Budget deficit/surplus, monetary and fiscal policies, economic growth, and international trade.

+AP PHYSICS 1

Grade Levels: 10, 11, 12
Prerequisite: Conceptual Physics (recommended for student success), and Algebra 2 (concurrent or completed) Application Required.

Course ID# – Two Semesters (FY)

AP Physics 1 is the equivalent of the first semester of introductory, algebra-based college courses.  This course explores topics such as Newtonian mechanics (including rotational motion); work, energy, and power; mechanical waves and sound; and introductory, simple circuits.  Because this course is taught over an entire year, there is more time to foster deeper conceptual understanding through increased hands-on laboratory work.  Through inquiry-based learning, students will develop scientific critical thinking and reasoning skills.  Special projects and topics of particular interest to students will be included as time permits.

AP Physics 1 and 2 are highly recommended for students interested in science, engineering, or medicine.  Though not mandatory, students are strongly encouraged to take the AP Physics 1 exam in May.

+AP PHYSICS 2

Grade Levels: 11, 12
PrerequisiteA or B in AP Physics 1: Algebra Based; Precalculus (concurrent or completed); Application Required.

AP Physics 2 is the equivalent of the second semester of introductory, algebra-based college courses.  This course explores topics such as fluid statics and dynamics; thermodynamics with kinetic theory; PV (gas) diagrams and probability; electrostatics; electrical circuits with capacitors; magnetic fields; electromagnetism; physical and geometric optics; and quantum, atomic, and nuclear physics.  Because this course is taught over an entire year, there is more time to foster deeper conceptual understanding through increased hands-on laboratory work.  Through inquiry-based learning, students will develop scientific critical thinking and reasoning skills.  Special projects and topics of particular interest to students will be included as time permits.

+AP SPANISH LANGUAGE

Grade Levels: 10, 11, 12
Prerequisite: A or B in Spanish 4 or Instructor Approval

Course ID# 1580 – Two Semesters (FY)

The AP Spanish Language course is designed to be comparable to an advanced level (fifth and sixth semester) college/university Spanish language course.  Students will continue to master the grammatical structures of Spanish, and will be called upon to perfect their skills in reading, writing, speaking and listening.  They will be exposed to a wide range of literature representative of the Hispanic world and will be called upon to display a high level of proficiency in its interpretation. The course will contain authentic material which will be selected to prepare students to take the Advanced Placement Examination in the spring of the year – should they choose to do so.  Students should expect an average of four hours of homework per night.

+AP STATISTICS

Grade Levels: 12
Prerequisite: A or B in Advanced Mathematical Concepts or Precalculus

Course ID# 670 – Two Semesters (FY)

AP Statistics is a study of data analysis, experimental design, probability as it relates to statistical inference, and the practice of data gathering and evaluation of statistical inference in an elementary statistics setting. It is activity based and incorporates use of graphing calculators and computers. TI-83 or TI-84 calculators are required for this course. Students have the option to take the Advanced Placement Exam and/or enroll in the Concurrent Enrollment Program through Boise State University.

+AP U.S. GOVERNMENT & POLITICS

Grade Levels: 12
Prerequisite: A or B in U.S. History or AP U.S. History.  Application Required.

Course ID# 1340 – Two Semesters (FY)

Advanced Placement (AP) Government and Politics is comprised of two courses of study: AP United States Government and Politics and AP Comparative Government and Politics.  The course provides qualified students with a learning experience equivalent to that obtained in most college introductory courses in government and politics.  AP U.S. Government and Politics gives students an analytical perspective on government and politics in the United States.  This course includes both the study of general concepts used to interpret U.S. politics and the analysis of specific examples.  It also requires familiarity with the various institutions, groups, beliefs, and ideas that constitute U.S. politics.  Students become acquainted with the variety of theoretical perspectives and explanations for various behaviors and outcomes.  Comparative Government and Politics provides students with the conceptual tools necessary to develop an understanding of some of the world’s diverse political structures and practices.  The course encompasses the study of both specific countries and their governments and general concepts used to interpret the political relationships and institutions found in virtually all national politics.  Five countries form the core of the course.  Four of these countries – Great Britain, France, China, and Russia/the former Soviet Union – are commonly covered in college-level introductory comparative politics courses.  For the fifth country, teachers may choose to study India, Mexico, or Nigeria.

+AP UNITED STATES HISTORY

Grade Level: 11
Prerequisites: A or B in World History. Application Required.

Course ID# 1320 – Two Semesters (FY)

AP United States History is available to those students who are interested in a more in-depth course in the historical development of America from Colonial times to the present. Students will work with more complex materials and at a quicker pace than that found in a standard high school class. Course work will be geared toward developing and practicing those skills, which are required at the college level. Students will learn to locate relevant and trustworthy sources and how to organize evidence to support their arguments. Focus will be placed on cause and effect relationships as well as on the climate in which opinions were formed and decisions made as historical events and issues are explored. Both primary and secondary sources will be used.

 

CONCURRENT ENROLLMENT:

+CONCURRENT BIOLOGY 191 - GENERAL BIOLOGY

Grade Levels:  11, 12
Prerequisite:  Students may enroll directly in Biology 191 with an A or B grade in Conceptual Physics/Physics and Chemistry (Biology is not a prerequisite, but if taken student must have received an A or B).  Application required.

Course ID# – Two Semesters (FY)

Biology 191 is a two-semester, college-level course.  This course is a detailed survey of the main concepts of biology with an emphasis on cellular processes, genetic principles, evolution, and ecology.  This course is designed for students who intend to major in the sciences and those in pre-med and related fields.  The college-level course in biology differs significantly from the usual first high school course in biology with respect to range and depth of topics covered, the type of laboratory work done and the time and effort required of students.  It aims to provide students with the conceptual framework, factual knowledge, and analytical skills necessary to deal critically with the rapidly changing science of biology.  Students and parents should be prepared for the unusually high demands on time and energy this course requires.  It is imperative that students remain consistently focused and organized throughout the entire year.  Students have the option to enroll in the Concurrent Enrollment Program through Boise State University.

+CONCURRENT ECON 201 - PRINCIPLES OF MICROECONOMICS

Grade Levels:  11, 12
Fall Semester (S1)
Course ID# Econ 202 – One Semester (S1)

Students have the option to take this course as a concurrent enrollment/dual credit course through Boise State University.  Three credits are offered for this course as EC 202: Principles of Microeconomics.  Students may also opt to take the AP Microeconomics exam.

Microeconomics is one of the two-course sequence of introductory economics courses.  Students will define economics, explore the underlying fundamentals common to all economic systems, and develop and examine a basic framework for analysis of the overall economic interactions that take place in our economy.  Students will examine the problems caused by scarcity and how prices in our economy act effectively to allocate scarce resources between all participants in our economy.  Building on these fundamentals, we will then explore the economic decision making by the smallest of economic units, the individual, household, or firm.  We will discover how these small economic units make “good” or rational economic decisions.  Study will then focus on the differing market structures that operate in our economy.

Having developed these fundamental theoretical tools, students will then focus upon some of the areas of applied economics; regulation and antitrust, supply and demand for the factors of production, wage determination, international trade, and the economic problems faced by specific industries.

+CONCURRENT ECON 201 - PRINCIPLES OF MACROECONOMICS

Grade Levels:  11, 12
Spring Semester: (S2)

Course ID# Econ 201 – One Semester (S2)

Students have the option to take this course as a concurrent enrollment/dual credit course through Boise State University.  Three credits are offered for this course as EC 201:  Principles of Macroeconomics.  Students may also opt to take the AP Macroeconomics exam.

Macroeconomics is second of the two-course sequence of introductory economics courses.  This course will define economics, explore the underlying fundamentals common to all economic systems, and develop and examine a basic framework for analysis of the overall economic interactions that take place in our economy.  Students will examine the problems caused by scarcity, how prices in our economy act effectively to allocate scarce resources between all participants in our economy.  Building on these fundamentals, we will then explore the measurement of aggregate economic activity, unemployment, and price level.  In addition, exploration of theories regarding overall economic activity and the policies that decision-makers use to control economic activity will be studied.

Having developed these fundamental theoretical tools, students will learn the role that money plays in our economy, the importance of the banking system, and the important role that the Federal Reserve Banking System has in maintaining economic stability and growth.  Lastly, we will explore some areas of current macroeconomic interest such as the Federal Budget deficit/surplus, monetary and fiscal policies, economic growth, and international trade.

+CONCURRENT ENGR 120 - INTRO. TO ENGINEERING

Grade Levels: 10, 11, 12
Prerequisite: Algebra II

Course ID# – Two Semesters (FY)

This survey course of engineering exposes students to some of the major concepts they’ll encounter in a post-secondary engineering course of study. Students employ engineering and scientific concepts in the solution of engineering design problems. They develop problem-solving skills and apply their knowledge of research and design to create solutions to various challenges. Students use critical thinking and gain design-oriented engineering experience by working through projects that expose them to engineering disciplines. Professional skill development includes teamwork, oral and written communication, and professional development/ethical responsibility. This course also introduces students to the math concepts that are used throughout engineering.

+CONCURRENT MATH 170 - CALCULUS 1

Grade Levels: 11, 12
Prerequisite: A or B in Precalculus

Course ID# – Two Semesters (FY)

Math 170 – Calculus 1 will provide qualified students with a college level mathematics experience containing topics included in a rigorous first semester college calculus course.  TI-84 and TI-89 calculators are required for this course.  Students have the option to enroll in the Concurrent Enrollment Program through Boise State University.

+CONCURRENT MATH 254 - INTRO. TO STATISTICS

Grade Levels:  12
Prerequisites: Algebra 2, Advanced Mathematical Concepts and/or Precalculus

Course ID# – Two Semesters (FY)

Introductory Statistics will focus on experiential statistics with an activity driven format, intended to give students an introduction to the practice of statistics.  Topics will include how a statistician gathers, summarizes, and draws conclusions from data in order for all students to become wise consumers of information.  TI-84 calculators are required for this course.

+CONCURRENT THEATRE ARTS 101 - THEATRE APPRECIATION

Grade Levels:  10, 11, 12
Course ID# – Two Semesters (FY)

Theatre Arts 101 is a non-performance, introductory level, seminar-style course designed to expand students’ understanding, appreciation and enjoyment of theatrical and other live performance through the study of theatre history, dramatic literature, and production techniques. Students will watch video and live performances, read, discuss and write about plays and performance.

+CONCURRENT SPANISH 201 - INTERMEDIATE SPANISH 1

Grade Levels:  10, 11, 12
Prerequisite: A or B in Spanish 4 or Instructor Approval/Application required.

Course ID# – Two Semesters (FY)

The AP Spanish Language and Culture course is a rigorous course taught completely and exclusively in Spanish that requires students to improve their proficiency across the three modes of communication. The course focuses on the integration of authentic resources including online print, audio, and audiovisual resources, as well as printed materials.  We encourage students to practice the target language consistently with the people around them so that the usage of the language can be as real and authentic as possible. In this course students develop a solid proficiency in integrating, comparing and contrasting in the target language as well as synthesizing written and aural materials, the formal and informal writing process, the informal and formal speaking proficiency through quality, authentic, and level appropriate audio and video materials. They are also exposed to the real world of the Spanish speaking world by listening and watching authentic and level appropriate videos from various sources from online magazines, newspapers and other related sources. They are also exposed to the Spanish literature including texts, magazines, articles, literary texts and other non technical writing. Several resources are used to facilitate the learning process and to give extra practice of topic already acquired. Technology is a powerful tool used to teach this course.

 

ADDITIONAL COURSES THAT REQUIRE APPLICATION APPROVAL:

Campus Ministry

Competitive Speech & Debate

Advanced Competitive Speech & Debate

Honors Chemistry

Intro. to Sports Medicine

Pastoral Arts

Yearbook